Commit 6fa5d4b2 authored by systemed's avatar systemed
Browse files

Update docs

parent 083c639e
# Changelog
## [2.0-rc1] - 2021-07-02
## [2.0.0] - 2021-07-09
### Added
- Optionally use on-disk workspace with new --store/--init-store options (@kleunen)
- Optionally use on-disk workspace with new --store option (@kleunen)
- Load .pbf in parallel (@kleunen)
- Static executable build for github CI (@kleunen)
- Mac and Windows CI builds (@kleunen)
......@@ -25,13 +25,14 @@
### Changed
- C++14 required
- Remove Lua scale functions now that we return metres
- Improve OpenMapTiles tag processing (@leonardehrenfried, @typebrook, @systemed, @QuentinC)
- Improve OpenMapTiles tag processing (@leonardehrenfried, @typebrook, @systemed, @QuentinC, @keichan34)
- Use OpenMapTiles processing as default in tilemaker directory
- Change OpenMapTiles minzoom to 0
- Default simplify_ratio to 2
- Ignore Lake Saimaa and USFS National Forest complex polygons in OpenMapTiles script
- Rewrite linestring/polygon combining, with zoom level control (`combine_below` and `combine_polygons_below`)
- Use boost::geometry::intersection for clipping (faster than clipper)
- New simplify code (@kleunen)
- Use boost::asio::thread_pool for tile generation (@kleunen)
- Fallback to valid polygons if simplification produces invalid ones
- Consistently use 1TBS in source
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......@@ -4,6 +4,8 @@ Tilemaker creates vector tiles (in Mapbox Vector Tile format) from an .osm.pbf p
Vector tiles are used by many in-browser/app renderers, and can also power server-side raster rendering. They enable on-the-fly style changes and greater interactivity, while imposing less of a storage burden. You can output them to individual files, or to a SQLite (.mbtiles) database.
See an example of a vector tile map produced by tilemaker at [tilemaker.org](https://tilemaker.org).
![Continuous Integration](https://github.com/systemed/tilemaker/workflows/Continuous%20Integration/badge.svg)
## Installing
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......@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ There's no one standard schema, but that used by the OpenMapTiles project is pop
Once you've generated your vector tiles, you need to render them on-screen. This is outside tilemaker's scope, but here's some pointers.
If you're serving them over the web, you'll need a server which accepts requests, and responds with the relevant tile. You'll usually do this by reading the record from the .mbtiles container (for which you can use a SQLite client library) and sending it back over HTTP. There's a Ruby example of how to do this in tilemaker's `server/` directory; ready-made servers in other languages are available as open source.
If you're serving them over the web, you'll need a server which accepts requests, and responds with the relevant tile. You'll usually do this by reading the record from the .mbtiles container (for which you can use a SQLite client library) and sending it back over HTTP. There's a Ruby example of how to do this in tilemaker's `server/` directory. Ready-made servers in other languages are available as open source, such as [mbtileserver](https://github.com/consbio/mbtileserver) (Go) and [tileserver-php](https://github.com/maptiler/tileserver-php), or you can use [tileserverless](https://github.com/geolonia/tileserverless) to serve direct from AWS.
It's then up to the client to render the tiles. There are a few libraries that do this, but the most popular and full-featured is that developed by Mapbox, usually known as Mapbox GL. The latest versions of this are closed-source and require a Mapbox contract, but the earlier open-source version has been forked and continues as [MapLibre GL](https://github.com/maplibre), which we recommend. There's a JavaScript version as well as an iOS/Android native version.
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